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Am I Just My Brain?

Date

30th March 2020, 7:00pm - 9:00pm

Venue

St Peter's, Vere Street, London W1G 0DQ

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Some would say that the conscious ‘mind’ is simply a product of the grey and white stuff found in our skulls: that matter is all that matters.

But do our neurons define who we are? What are the implications for our supposed free will? For religious belief? And where does our mind fit in?

Your brain makes up only 2% of your body weight, and yet it requires 75% of your energy. There are as many cells in your brain as there are stars in the average galaxy (70-100 million, to be exact). It contains 100 billion neurons, each of which is firing thousands of impulses a second to its neighbours at over 250 miles per hour.

The brain is the most complex organ in the body, and perhaps the most sophisticated biological thing in the entire universe. Some would say that the conscious ‘mind’ is simply a product of the grey and white stuff found in our skulls: that matter is all that matters.

But do our neurons define who we are? What are the implications for our supposed free will? For religious belief? And where does our mind fit in?

Having achieved a PhD in brain imaging, Dr Sharon Dirckx is familiar with the complexity of the brain, but also with its limits. Join us for an evening exploring the fundamental questions of our existence – what and who am I? – and understand why there is far, far more to us than just our brains.


Dr Sharon Dirckx is a senior tutor at the Oxford Centre for Christian Apologetics (OCCA). She has a PhD in brain imaging from the University of Cambridge and has held research posts at the University of Oxford and the Medical College of Wisconsin.

After becoming a Christian at university, Sharon spent over a decade in brain imaging before entering the field of Christian apologetics. In her most recent work, Am I Just My Brain?, she examines questions of human identity through the lens of neuroscience, philosophy and theology.